Parent power

Screen Shot 2016-02-26 at 02.09.10As a young child I spent most my time being a fairly quiet observer. I didn’t speak much and when I did I noticed that most of what I said wasn’t being understood. It wasn’t obvious to me that my words sounded very different to how I intended them to sound. In my head I was talking the same as everyone else. You can imagine how confusing and frustrating that could become. I didn’t have trouble joining in with other children relying on play as a means of communication. The other children noticed my limited speech but this never got in the way of playing together. Many children with autism find playing together very challenging so my ability to do this helped my learn some valuable social skills. My younger sister and old brother helped me interact with other kids because they involved me in things they did. As I got older I notice all the things about me that made be different by comparing myself to other kids my age. I knew I had autism, limited speech and I didn’t like eye contact. I started to want my own independance but my autism meant I couldn’t do all the same things my brother and sister could do. I don’t have the ability to imagine seeing the world through someone else’s eyes because my condition restricts me from this method of thinking. When you live in a world where most people are difficult to read, either through facial expressIons or the pitch and tone in someone’s voice, forming bonds and building friendships isnt easy. If I had it my way I would be on my own all the time but that would isolate me and I would miss out on a whole side of life that could eventually become very important to me. My family and support workers encouraged me to give things a go or to take part in something outside my comfort zone, but they they are always very careful not to force me to do these things knowing that those types of forceful actions could become potentially traumatizing for me. ~ Adrian 

A sibling perspective

Adrian, Helen and I can remember our childhood together very clearly. The highs and lows and everything in between. We had our family dramas just like any other family but Adrian’s autism seemed to dominate everything in those early years. Looking back I can see that the hardest part of living with a loved one with ASD was that we weren’t very experienced at seeing the world though Adrian’s eyes. It took us a while to learn how to avoid misunderstandings and develop a heightened sense of autism awareness and how Adrian’s autism affected him. I remember thinking to myself many times how handy it would be to go back in time and show the younger me how easy it can be to sustain a positive interactive connection with Adrian by simply thinking in an autistic way.
Adrian and I have gathered together a selection of helpful posts aimed at helping parents and siblings to connect with a loved one who has autism. We hope that we can pass on some of our early years experiences so it may improve your family life. ~ Mark

3 Concepts people with autism want you to imagine

Imagine a world where almost everyone has autism and because everyone thinks, feels and experiences the world with an autistic mind nobody called it autism, they just called it normal. Read more…


A Parents Embarrassment

All parents have experienced that moment where their child has either said or done something that caused an embarrassing situation. So it would be unfair to judge a parents who has an autistic child of feeling the same. Read more…


Will my autistic child ever be normal?

This simple thought experiment aims to inspire change through positive perception. Its only when you can see yourself in a positive light that you will be able to help do the same for your child and the word ‘normal’ will evently hold an entirely different meaning for you. Read more….


How does an autistic person think

ll parents have experienced that moment where their child has either said or done something that caused an embarrassing situation. So it would be unfair to judge a parents who has an autistic child of feeling the same. Read more…


aa me speech bubble

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